1st EPICamp. 15-16 october / Agenda

EPICUR > 1st EPICamp. 15-16 october / Agenda

Mobility, Migration, Multilingualism: Shaping European Identities and Languages in Past and Present

EPICUR’s first EPICamp will take place 15/16 October 2021 fully online. The EPICamp will be an immersive experience bringing together researchers, non-university partners and from our eight partner universities and beyond.

Discover the full programme:

Friday, October 15, 2021
9.00-9.30 am /
Welcome speech
Chairs & Speakers

Chairs:
– Katarzyna Dziubalska-Kołaczyk (Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan)
– Bernd Kortmann
(Albert-Ludwig University, Freiburg)

Description

Welcome to our first EPICamp “Mobility, Migration, Multilingualism: Shaping European Identities and Languages in Past and Present”:

  • Welcome Address by the Academic Board
  • Programme Overview
9.30-11.00 am /
Session I (Parallel Session): “Is there harmony in diversity? Major, minor and minority languages and cultures in the multilingual environment”

Target Audience: PhD candidates, early postdocs, late-early postdocs

Chairs & Speakers

Chairs:
– Karolina Gortych-Michalak & Marcin Michalski (Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan)

Speakers:
– George Pavlidis, Stella Markantonatou, Panagiotis G. Krimpas & Ritvan Karaho‎ǧa (Philotis Project Team)
– Eleni Griva (University of Western Macedonia)
– Georgia Katsouda
(Academy of Athens)
– Jowita Niewulis-Grablunas
(AMU Poznan/Dzuks Community)

Description

A lot of countries and world regions are multilingual and multicultural. This is a consequence of how, on the one hand, indigenous languages and cultures have  remained in their original locations for centuries, and, on the other hand, younger communities and migrants have appeared and settled in the same places and  spaces during historical and present migrations. Some indigenous languages, accompanied by their cultures, have become minority languages. Some have acquired the status of official languages of a certain country or region. Finally, some are recognized as stronger or weaker players in the culture and language game. Some languages and cultures, in the course of social, political, cultural and economic development, have acquired the dominant status with time. Concurrently, minor and minority languages and cultures coexist in the field of science, culture and business, but only some of them enjoy an influential role. Situations of this kind are globally noticeable, and for this reason we suggest that the shaping of European cultures and languages can be discussed with reference to worldwide benchmarks. This marks a diversity of turning points in world history, as well as common social, political, cultural and linguistic phenomena.

The purpose of the session is to take a closer look at the interrelations among major, minor and minority languages in the multilingual and multicultural environment. The main questions we want to ask the researchers and the representatives of cultural institutions, minority communities and economic entities concern the performance and the value of contacts between, or among, minor and minority languages and cultures. Consequently, we want to ponder the question of whether the existence of an intermediary — a dominant, regionally or worldwide popular language or culture — is a positive or negative factor in linguistic harmony and cultural diversity.

The following is an illustrative but not limiting list of topics of discussion:

    1. Role and performance of communication between minor-minor and minor-minority languages in science, culture and business
    2.Minor-to-minor and minor-to-minority culture transfer with and without a bridge language
    3.Minor-to-minor and minor-to-minority translation and interpreting with or without a pivot language
    4.Prestige of minority languages and cultures in national and international public and private for a
    5.Valorisation of less known or popular (minor) cultures and languages in globalised tourism, travels, investments, events, etc.
    6.A bridge language as an (in)adequate conveyor of less known or popular cultures and languages and its role in preserving diversity
    7.Reasons & needs to teach minor languages for specific purposes
    8.Contribution of research into minor and minority languages and cultures to world science
    9.Definitions of major, minor and minority languages and cultures in science
    10.Role and impact of minor languages in the dissemination of research

We believe that an open-discussion formula facilitates interaction among the participants. Young researchers (PhD candidates, early postdocs, late-early postdocs) are especially welcome!

9.30-11.00 am /
Session II (Parallel Session): “The Linguistic Landscape as a multilingual educational space”
Panel Discussion with invited guests
Chairs & Speakers

Chairs:
– Camilla Badstübner-Kizik & Danuta Wiśniewska (Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan)

Speakers:
– Jannis Androutsopoulos (University of Hamburg, Germany)
– Sabine Jentges
(Radboud University, The Netherlands)
– Edina Krompák
(University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland)
– Heiko F. Marten
(DAAD IC Riga / Rēzekne Academy of Technologies, Latvia)
– Silvia Melo Pfeifer & Lisa Marie Brinkmann
(University of Hamburg, Germany)
– Maris Saagpakk
(Tallinn University, Estonia)

Description

For a good twenty years now, the Linguistic Landscape has been developing into an important topic of (socio)linguistic research. From the very beginning, questions of multilingualism, (more or less official) hierarchies of languages, (open or covert) language policies as well as the interplay between language functions and specific target groups have been of special interest to linguists all over the world. In addition to this, in recent years the didactic dimension of the Linguistic Landscape has come increasingly into focus. Written language(s) in public spaces – be it street, business, company or restaurant signage, billboards or election posters, banners, stickers, graffiti, packaging or leaflets – reflect the societies that create and inhabit them. At the same time, they offer a wealth of freely accessible, original, authentic, up-to-date and very often multilingual teaching and learning impulses for the exploration of these societies – in the fields of geography, history, arts, politics, economics, environment or social studies, but above all in the field of teaching and learning of and about languages. Activities resulting from the Linguistic Landscape as a whole or from each of its parts can target different learning groups, learning goals or learning styles and may concern both the learning of foreign and majority languages as well as the development of a comprehensive language awareness and language attention.

It is a common place that each linguistic landscape consists of specific ‘subspaces’ (such as the train station, city centre, cemetery or supermarket), which in turn are distinguished by specific content-related and linguistic features worthwhile discussing. This is all the more true for educational spaces (such as the classroom, school, university campus, library or museum) which provide innovative opportunities for teaching and learning alike.

Our thematic session aims in two directions: on the one hand, we want to demonstrate that the linguistic landscape as a whole presents an authentic learning space providing ever renewing teaching and learning offers. On the other hand, we want to draw attention to dedicated learning spaces, their linguistic characteristics and their own didactic opportunities (schoolscape, eduspace). It is precisely these spaces that can show in a special way, how our societies develop and what moves them.In our session, the invited speakers will present their current projects illustrating the didactic potential of the Linguistic Landscape from different angles, in different places and for different target groups.

Among the featured projects are initiatives such as: LinguaSnapp Hamburg (https://www.linguasnapp.uni-hamburg.de/), LoCALL: LOcal Linguistic Landscapes for global language education in the school context (https://locallproject.eu/), Nachbarsprache&Buurcultuur (https://www.ru.nl/nachbarsprache/), swiss-scape (https://swiss-scape.ch/en/) and others. The short presentations will be followed by a discussion between the speakers and the audience, which aims at the future of the Linguistic Landscape as an educational space of growing importance.

We believe that an open-discussion formula facilitates interaction among active participants and audience alike. Our dominant goals are strengthening contacts and initiating a multilingual thematic cooperation.

11.00-12.00 am /
Poster Session / Research Chat
Chairs & Speakers

Interested Participants

Description

We invite participants to share their research (e.g. PhD projects, publications, case studies etc.) through digital posters and videos. Participants of the EPICamps will be able to upload files, videos and leave their contact information on the virtual conference space for fellow participants to visit and engage in our “research chats”.

12.00-12.30 am /
Speed Dating
Chairs & Speakers

Eva Rüskamp / Sarah Joeris

Description

This session introduces participants to the “speed dating” tool of worksup and invites especially – though not exclusively – interested early career researchers to have 3 minute speed dating one-on-one calls with their matches.

12.30-13.30 am /
(Interactive) Lunch Break
Chairs & Speakers

Eva Rüskamp / Sarah Joeris

Description

Did you meet someone during speed dating? Would you like to continue your discussion from a session? Then join our interactive lunch break in the designated SpatialChat Lunch Room.

13:30-15:00 am /
Session III (Parallel Session): “Multiple Language Acquisition, Processing and Development”
Chairs & Speakers

Chair:
– Magdalena Wrembel, Kamil Dlugosz & Aleksandra Putowska (Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan)

Speakers:
– Kamil Długosz (AMU Poznan)
– Megan Brown (Boston University)
– Adriana Hanulikova (University of Freiburg, Germany)
– Nicole Rodriquez (Rutgers University / AMU Poznan)
– Iga Krzysik (AMU Poznan)
– Halina Lewandowska (AMU Poznan)
– Kyle Parrish (Rutgers University)
– Romana Kopeckova (University of Münster, Germany)
– Anna Balas (AMU Poznan)
– Zuzanna Cal (AMU Poznan)

Description

The aim of this panel discussion is to bring together researchers working in the area of multiple language acquisition and processing. We would like to discuss current trends and approaches as well as methodological concerns in the field. Apart from data-driven discussions, we intend to engage in more theoretical debates regarding the present accounts of L3/Ln acquisition and the nature of a multilingual competence more generally. We are also going to focus on research methods used in the field in order to address the question of what they reveal about language representation vs. processing and how they can inform the theory. PhD students and early career researchers are especially welcome to present their research interests and ideas.

We invite proposals in all areas of research in multilingual acquisition and processing, whether or not linked directly to the overarching EPICamp theme, including:

  • multiple language acquisition and learning (L3, Ln);
  • psycho- and neurolinguistics of multilingualism;
  • early multilingualism and heritage language development in multilingual settings;
  • language processing in multilinguals;
  • multilingual language use in different contexts;
13:30-15:00 am /
Session IV (Parallel Session): “Elite Mobility, Migration, Multilingualism of the Past”
 
Chairs & Speakers

Chairs:
– Wojciech Sowa, Jakub Kujawiński, Miłosz Sosnowski, Joachim Stephan & Sambor Czerwiński (Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan)

Speakers:

– Kamil Długosz (AMU Poznan)
– Megan Brown (Boston University)
– Adriana Hanulikova (University of Freiburg, Germany)
– Nicole Rodriquez (Rutgers University / AMU Poznan)
– Iga Krzysik (AMU Poznan)
– Halina Lewandowska (AMU Poznan)
– Kyle Parrish (Rutgers University)
– Romana Kopeckova
(University of Münster, Germany)
– Anna Balas (AMU Poznan),
– Maria Coady (Florida University)
– Zuzanna Cal (AMU Poznan)

Description

The broadly formulated “Methodologies in Dialogue” aims at revisiting the historical and current approaches to studying ” Elite Mobility, Migration and Multilingualism of the Past” taken by various scholarly disciplines. How are the individual elements of the above defined, conceptualized and contextualized in/as their research frameworks? What are the analytical tools, individual and as toolsets, offered by various disciplines and how their use can be justified (fully, partially or perhaps outright rejected) in other fields of research? What new

possibilities and claims have historically been and are currently being offered by sciences?

“Mobility, Migration and Multilingualism” have been a hot topic in the political debates of the modern West. What are the questions that can be (and have been) responsibly asked of the past and how can the answers be responsibly used in the current discourse – and conversely, what are (were) the irresponsible questions, reckless uses and outright abuses of the answers? All in all, we want to reflect on the language(s) that we are using when trying to understand individuals and societies of the past?

We would like to consider the issues above with you in an open discussion. Below you will find a sampling of narrower topics that we are concerned with, but we are interested in your research, especially within the framework of EPICamp theme:

  • categorizing, describing, systematization (in the past and now)
  • strategies of social mobility (inclusion in and co-optation to elites, intra-elite mobility) and elite social stratification
  • scholarly mobility (scholars, students, monks/friars), textual transmission, book circulation, knowledge-transmission, cultural transmission (and its reception)
  • Elites and uses/misuses/abuses of the past (narratives, myths, ideologies; instrumentalization of the image of “ancient Elites” in politics, ideology and culture; false continuities)
  • strategies of creating elites’ image: “who are the Elite”, “where did Elites came from” – medieval and early modern images as well as images created by modern scholars and the entanglement of both in power relations
  • “our” Elites and “their” Elites (constructing the difference in past cultures, literature, law etc.)
  • multilingualism of Elites (political, religious, intellectual, social)
15:30-17.00 am /
Session V (Parallel Session): “Show us your Multilingual Data and how you handle them”
EPICUR Open Discussion, participants are invited to share their data  

participants are invited to share their data

Chairs & Speakers

Chair:
– Christian Mair (Albert-Ludwig-University, Freiburg)

Description

Wrangling with multilingual data: Show us your data and how you transcribe and annotate them

Anybody who has ever worked with multilingual data knows that they are more difficult to transcribe than monolingual text and that our standard digital tools work less well for them. This open discussion will provide a forum for you to share some of your own multilingual data, discuss the way you transcribe and annotate them, and raise any problems that you are currently facing (all in 10 minutes’ time, with another 10 minutes for discussion). We are hoping for a productive exchange of ideas in a constructive “hands-on” atmosphere that will leave all participants a little wiser at the end. If you wish to participate, contact the convenor at christian.mair@anglistik.uni-freiburg.de, briefly characterising the data you wish to present and discuss.

15:30-17.00 am /
Session VI (Parallel Session): “Changes in European education. Between Middle Ages and Modern Era”
Workshop with Input (Case Study)
Chairs & Speakers

Chairs:
– Krzysztof Ratajczak &Michał Nowicki (Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan)

Description

  1. Opening talk:

From Cathedral School to Renaissance Gymnasium in Poznan. Case study (prof. Krzysztof Ratajczak, dr. Michał Nowicki)

  1. Workshop:

The turn of the Middle Ages and modern times was a special period in the history of culture. It was a time when the old views of the world, and deeply rooted social structures were intensely verified by humanistic ideas about the place of man in the world, his needs and possibilities of satisfying them. This is particularly evident in the case of education, which was undergoing a thorough transformation during this period.

The aim of the proposed workshop is to analyse the aforementioned transformations as exemplified by the Poznań cathedral intellectual environment and to examine which factors influenced programs, books, methods of learning etc. We deeply believe that it is possible to find similar examples in the other parts of Europe, and that this can enable a discussion and exchange of experiences between participants.

The workshop will be partly based on texts in Latin so we ask the participants to acquaint themselves in advance with the materials we provide.

  1. Discussion

We would like to consider the issues above together with you. A sampling of narrower topics below lists the themes we are concerned with, but we are interested in your research, especially within the framework of EPICamp theme:

  • scholarly mobility (scholars, students, monks/friars), textual transmission, book circulation, knowledge-transmission, cultural transmission (and its reception)
  • multilingualism of town-Elites (political, religious, intellectual, social)
  • organisation of school system in Europe in the late medieval period and its transition in early modern Era
  • the cultural change and crisis of the medieval society
  • continuity and discontinuity
  • new ideas in culture
  • how Renaissance influenced the school realities in early modern Europe

The workshop is open to all researchers. We especially encourage PhD students and early career researchers – join us and let us know what you are working on!

17.00-17.45 am /
Rectors Keynote
Chairs & Speakers

Chair:
– Katarzyna Jankowiak (Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan)

Speakers:
Pr. Bogumiła Kaniewska, Rector (Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan) & Daniela Kleinschmit VP Internationalization and Sustainability (Albert-Ludwig-University, Freiburg)

Description

Her Magnificence Rector Professor Dr. Bogumiła Kaniewska will hold the keynote address for the EPICamp I, addressing the need for more European collaboration on the big societal issues and which role the next generation of humanities and social science scholars will play in this pursuit.

18.00-19:30 /
EPICURious Pub quiz

After a long day of academic pursuits, the EPICUR Team invites all participants to test their knowledge of popular culture, European history and the EPICUR partners. Bring your after-work drinks and mingle in our designated SpatialChat Room “the EPICUR Pub” and win an EPICURean surprise package

Saturday, October 16, 2021
9:00 – 9:30 /
Research/Career Chats
Chairs & Speakers

Chair:
– Katarzyna Jankowiak (Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan)

Description

This session will either be the keynote address by the two rectors or become an open space to discuss research, career development etc.

9:30 – 11:00 /
Session VII (Parallel Session): “Bilingualism, Migration and Identity”
(Part I)
Presentations / Open discussion
Chairs & Speakers

Chair:
– Katarzyna Jankowiak  & Jacek Kubera (Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan)

Speakers:
– Imene Abdellaoui (UHA Mulhouse)
– Mikko Bentlin
(AMU Poznan)
– Beniamin Kłaniecki
(AMU Poznan)
– Marcin Naranowicz
(AMU Poznan)
– Claudia Sanchez
(Illinois State University)
– Anna Skałba
(AMU Poznan)

Description

The aim of this panel discussion is to bring together researchers working in the area of emotion and identity in the bilingual context. We would like to discuss current trends and approaches as well as methodological challenges in the field, focusing on linguistic, psychological as well as sociological perspectives. We also intend to engage in debates regarding the role of migration and mobility in the process of identity construction and preservation. Furthermore, we are going to focus on research methods used in the field of sociology, linguistics, and psychology in order to address the interplay between bilingualism, migration, emotions, and self-identity.

In this session, we aim to discuss, for instance:

  • emotion processing in bilingualism;
  • psycho- and neurolinguistics of bilingualism;
  • foreign language effect;
  • migration and identity construction;
  • experience and memory of migration within families and local communities;
  • migration, inequalities and social change in local and global perspective;
  • sense of belonging by different immigrant generations;
  • minorities groups and diasporas in local, state and inter-state policy;
  • transnationality and everyday live between cultures, societies and economies;
  • methodological challenges in migration, emotion, and language studies;
  • language, emotions and identity: avenues for interdisciplinary research.
09:30-11:00 am/
Session VIII (Parallel Session): “Courts on the move”
Open Discussion
(participants are invited to share their work / ideas)
Chairs & Speakers

Chair:
– Eva von Contzen (Albert-Ludwig-University Freiburg)

Speakers:
Linus Möllenbrink, Albert-Ludwigs- Universität Freiburg
Jules Piet, Université de Strasbourg
– Hans-Jochen Schiewer,
Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
– Milosz Sosnowski,
AMU Poznan

Description

The premodern court was constantly on the move. Premodern governance and leadership meant physical presence of the ruler all over their dominion. All rulers, be they emperors, kings, dukes, or bishop, were forced to travel in order to keep control over their people. Records and charters and their places of issue give us an idea about the itineraries and the people who testified to decisions. The contexts and effects of the mobility of the premodern court are thematised in both vernacular and Latin sources. The courtiers’ ideal vs. real (often negative) behaviour came to be increasingly addressed in medieval and early modern writings (for example in Walter Map’s De nugis curialium). So far, no holistic approach was made from a European-wide and comparative perspective to understand this mobile mode of life. We propose such an approach – which clearly addresses the trajectory of mobility, migration, and identity – and suggest focusing on topics such as: conversation, decision-making, and scholarly discussions “in the saddle”, communication strategies within and between courts, uses of language, intercultural contacts, marriage networks all over Europe, infrastructural problems and challenges, food supply, and the role of entertainment. This is a truly interdisciplinary topic that requires to be approached from multiple angles: history, art history, music, theology, archeology, philosophy, sociology, Classics, modern languages, linguistics, climate history, history of medicine, geography, Arabic and Byzantine studies. In addition, the premodern life of the nobility and their royal household can also be set in dialogue with contemporary phenomena such as younger generations “on the move”.   

11:00 – 11:15 /
Break
11:15 – 12:30 /
Session IX(Parallel Session): “Bilingualism, Migration and Identity”
(Part II)
Presentations / Open discussion
Chairs & Speakers

Chair:
– Katarzyna Jankowiak & Jacek Kubera (Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan)

Speakers:
– Imene Abdelloaui (UHA Mulhouse)
– Mikko Bentlin
(AMU Poznan)
– Beniamin Kłaniecki
(AMU Poznan)
– Marcin Naranowicz
(AMU Poznan)
– Claudia Sanchez
(Illinois State University)
– Anna Skałba
(AMU Poznan)

Description

The aim of this panel discussion is to bring together researchers working in the area of emotion and identity in the bilingual context. We would like to discuss current trends and approaches as well as methodological challenges in the field, focusing on linguistic, psychological as well as sociological perspectives. We also intend to engage in debates regarding the role of migration and mobility in the process of identity construction and preservation. Furthermore, we are going to focus on research methods used in the field of sociology, linguistics, and psychology in order to address the interplay between bilingualism, migration, emotions, and self-identity.

In this session, we aim to discuss, for instance:

  • emotion processing in bilingualism;
  • psycho- and neurolinguistics of bilingualism;
  • foreign language effect;
  • migration and identity construction;
  • experience and memory of migration within families and local communities;
  • migration, inequalities and social change in local and global perspective;
  • sense of belonging by different immigrant generations;
  • minorities groups and diasporas in local, state and inter-state policy;
  • transnationality and everyday live between cultures, societies and economies;
  • methodological challenges in migration, emotion, and language studies;
  • language, emotions and identity: avenues for interdisciplinary research.
11:15 – 12:30/
Session X (Parallel Session): “Center(s), peripheries, borders”
A panel discussion
Chairs & Speakers

Chair:
– Maciej Dorna, Paweł Dziadul & Filip Jakubowski(Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan)

Description

Let us take a closer look at the workings of elite mobility, migration and multilingualism in the CENTER(s), on the PERIPHERIES and within the BORDER societies of medieval and early modern period. We would like to bring together researchers of geographically diverse past societies, using various disciplines and methodologies to inquire into social, political and cultural processes involving elites.We would like to tackle the fascinating research questions that apply to many different areas and regions marked with cultural, religious, political, or ethnic borders (e.g. the Baltic region, the Balkans, Iberia/Al-Andalus). Are the phenomena we are studying and research strategies we are using somehow similar no matter the geographical region and its relative closeness to the imagined center? What are the similarities and differences between our approaches? How were those historically developed? And last but not least, what and how can we learn from each other?We are looking forward to discussing the following themes, both in the past cultures’ center(s) and on the peripheries, but we welcome other topics as well:the relations between migrant elites and indigenous population (center(s) vs peripheries)imported elites and indigenous elites and their interrelations (center(s) vs peripheries)transfer of elites and their knowledge for creation of new institutions (religious, state, educational etc.)migrant elites (religious, ethnic) and new laws imposed by themintellectual elites and their interactions with local populace (e.g., imported artists and their production as means of cultural transfer)elite interconfessional /interreligious relations and law (e.g. Islamic law and its creators in times of change – in Iberia, Balkans)

12:30 – 13:30 /
Lunch break
13:30 – 15:00 /
Session XI: “Knowledge in Motion: Study Abroad & Mobility”
Chairs & Speakers

Speakers:
– Sybille Heinzmann (St. Gallen University of Teacher Education)
Angeliki Kiapekaki (UNISTRA Strasbourg)
Zeynep Köylü (University of Basel)
Judith Borràs (Universitat de Lleida)

Description

The study abroad (SA) context is a favorable learning environment to improve someone’s foreign/second language (L2) and intercultural competence resulting in substantial gains in a relatively short time (Sanz, 2014). Therefore, particularly tertiary level L2 learners feel motivated to participate in international mobility programs believing that it will boost their language skills and help achieve their ultimate goal of becoming proficient L2 users. However, second language acquisition (SLA) research has shown that it is not that rare for sojourners to return home with almost no development (Borràs & Llanes, 2019). Several factors have been discussed considering such “failure” following some time spent abroad, such as (1) insufficient initial level of proficiency in the L2, (2) individual differences like self-regulation, agency, and personality (Pawlak et al., 2020) (3) socio-emotional factors preventing sojourners building social networks, and (3) task-effects, in other words how we elicit language performance data (Pérez-Vidal, 2014).

In this target group discussion, we want to problematize the case of those who returned home empty-handed. We will discuss how we can overcome potential problems not limited to those listed above which hinder or seriously diminish linguistic, personal, and cultural gains following a study abroad experience. The session will be guided and initiated by the following questions:

  1. What factors might prevent sojourners’ personal, [inter]cultural, and linguistic development?
  2. What pre-departure orientation might prepare future sojourners to make the best of their SA experience?
  3. Are there any methodological considerations for SA researchers to revisit for optimal data collection and analysis?
15:00 – 16:00 /
Session XII: “Migration, Multilingualism, Educational Systems”
Chairs & Speakers

Chair:
– Maria Coady (Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan)

Speakers:
– Jakub Isański (Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan)
– Michał B.Paradowski
(Institute of Applied Linguistics, University of Warsaw)

Description

This Panel Discussion, followed by an open floor addresses multilingualism in the classroom from various perspectives. Moving from the integration of minority groups into educational systems, to plurilingual pedagogies and the challenges of “translanguaging” (TRLNG), and finally to the challenges to teachers posed by a new generation of multilingual students, the panel brings together three scholars that highlight different aspect of linguistic diversity in educational systems across the world. The input by these speakers will serve as the basis for open discussions about dealing with the linguistic consequence of migration and increased mobility of students and teachers.

(tbc) Highlighting also the aspect of involuntary mobility and migration, this session also opens a space to discuss the role of asylum seekers and scholars at risk and their challenges to access a foreign educational system with all its language barriers. .

16:00-17:00 /
Closing Discussion /
Showcase
Description

Finally, EPICUR invites all participants to come together to a closing event and showcase, giving the space to share impressions of the different panels, the event, and network some more. For this special event, please join us again around the virtual fireside. 

We are using cookies to give you the best experience. You can find out more about which cookies we are using or switch them off in privacy settings.
AcceptPrivacy Settings

GDPR

  • Cookies

Cookies

We use different cookies on the site to improve the interactivity of the website and our services. Consent is considered implicit if you continue your navigation on our sites without configuring cookies.

What is a “cookie” ?

A “cookie” is a file of limited size, usually consisting of letters and digits, sent by the Internet server to the browser’s cookie file located on the hard drive of your computer.

3 types of cookies are stored by the site :

  • Internal cookies needed for the site to operate
    They do not represent any danger for your privacy since the cookie memorising your choice for the configuration of cookies is part of this category.
  • Audience measuring cookies
    Depending on the sites visited, we use Google Analytics to analyse the audiences. Your consent is requested prior to storing Google Analytics cookies.
  • Third party cookies intended to improve the interactivity of the site
    These in particular are :
    • sharing buttons (Twitter and Facebook)
    • lists of tweets (Twitter)
    • videos broadcast on the site (YouTube, Dailymotion)

These features use third party cookies directly stored by these services. During your first visit to our site, a banner informs you of the presence of these cookies and asks you to indicate your choice. They are stored only if you agree, or if you continue your navigation on the site by visiting a second page of the same site. At any time, you can find information and configure your cookies to accept or refuse them by going onto the page [Cookie management] at the top of each page of the site. You can specify your preference either globally for the site or service by service.